halladayyoung

The Roy Halladay we saw this afternoon during his retirement press conference was about the most aloof and least intense version of the man that I’ve ever seen– not that I’ve ever been near him up close– and it was that guy who showed up this afternoon on the Fan 590′s Prime Time Sports, effusively speaking about the injury troubles that have ultimately derailed his career (he said this morning that he’s pitched through a fracture in his back for the last two seasons!), and about the trials and tribulations along the way. He seemed like a man truly at peace with the decision to hang ‘em up, which is the way he said he was leaning even before his final, disastrous season began.

Much of what he said to Bob McCown and Damian Cox, including his deep expressions of gratitude to the Jays organization and its fans, was also covered during the presser this afternoon in Orlando– an eight-plus minute segment of which you can find at the bottom of this post– but there were a few new revelations worth noting…

For one, there’s the stuff that Shi Davidi gave us a taste of earlier in the afternoon with this tweet:

Apparently it wasn’t just some token invite with vague parameters, as according to Halladay’s radio hit, he’s been invited to be at the Jays facility in Dunedin during Spring Training. Maybe not all the time or anything, but he’ll be there– and since he still lives nearby, in Clearwater, that makes sense. It can’t hurt– especially if he’s the guy we saw this morning and heard this afternoon on the radio.

He also said that his interest in working with the club in some capacity didn’t extend to just on-field stuff, as he expressed interest in getting a chance to be a “fly on the wall” in the front office, and to see how things operate from that perspective, which it sounded like the Jays would be accommodating with. Cool! Suck it Phillies!

Y’know, at least until the Jays move to Palm Beach Gardens and Roy defects back.

Oh, and one more thing:

In talking about his return after nearly crashing out of baseball early in his career, he cites– as we’ve heard before– the work of Harvey Dorfman, author of The Mental ABCs of Pitching, as being very important. He says he had nightmares– and it sounded like he meant literally– and saw sports psychologists about his failings on the mound and seemingly no longer being any good at the one thing he knew how to do. But what he said “made all the difference” was that when J.P. Ricciardi came on board with the Jays, and Halladay asked him about Dorfman. It turned out ol’ J.P. Moneyball had worked with Dorfman in Oakland, and he put the two in touch.

So… I’m pretty much just going to give Ricciardi credit for Halladay’s career. That’s how that works, right?

Ahh, OK, maybe it was mostly Roy. I guess.

Here’s the presser video, via BlueJays.com.

So… there’s that.

Comments (26)

  1. ThInk they’ll get him to chat with Romero?

    Absolute no brainer there I would think.

  2. I didn’t quite hear it the same way. Doc had already read Dorfman’s book before JP became GM, is the way I understood it. At that time, Doc knew that Dorfman had done work with A’s pitchers and went o JP to see if he knew him.

    Not that it really fucking matters, but I don’t give JP any credit – haha.

    Doc had already went about seeking out the help by reading the books and realizing he had a problem. So he deserves all the credit.

  3. Fuck sakes, #DocTheBest y’all.

    Getting sentimental.

  4. Very sad….I was dreaming of Halladay returning to the Jays for a playoff run as his last harrah…. Will miss seeing Doc pitch

  5. If Ricky Romero returned to being regular pitcher say #3 or #4, wouldn’t that be a huge boost to the Jays.?

    The return of Halladay to the Jays would be amazing a coach. It could attract prospects to the organization. Maybe some of the Jays picks would actually sign with the team.

  6. Too bad Josh Johnson isn’t still around – would have been interesting to see if Doc could do anything with him.

  7. It’s good news for the Jays that he’s planning on sticking around. I believe he can be a huge asset to the organization.

  8. Did anyone else catch Cox, McCown and Brunt talking about who they deemed the best position players in Blue Jays history?

    Obviously, they spoke at length about Alomar. McCown talked about Devon White (!), Cox championed George Bell & Brunt cast a vote for Fernandez. They bantered back & forth about this for probably over five minutes…& I couldn’t fucking believe they didn’t mention Carlos Delgado once. Not once! All those team records he holds the guy gets no respect. Unreal.

    • Damien Cox? You mean Mr Baseball?

    • White isn’t the worst pick ever- Ninth all-time in Jays fWAR in 650 games.

    • I was about to mock them too, but then I got stunned by the following:

      Devon White has 41.8 career fWAR, and 47.0 bWAR. Wow. Mostly compiled with Toronto, too.

      Well damn.

      Carlos Delgado was a 43.7 fWAR 44.3 bWAR player, by comparison. Obviously, someone should have brought up Delgado.

    • Delgado is the best position player in Jays history. Bar none. The guy almost all of the Jays offensive records and was the definition of consistency for better than a decade. He put up at least 20HR/85RBI for 13 straight seasons. Unreal.

      • If you’re talking about the best offensive position player, it’s Delgado. If you’re talking about the best all-around position player, it’s Alomar.

    • New poll:

      Best pitcher in Jays history: Stieb or Doc?

      Both had great runs! For my money, Stieb was the pitcher of the 80s ahead of Morris. And Doc had a fantastic run from 2002 to 2009 excepting one injury-riddled year in ’04.

  9. so glad he didn’t cry

  10. Wow, there really is a surprising amount of overlap between Ricciardi’s tenure and Halladay the Good. The great second half renaissance in 2001 came under Ash, but Ricciardi oversaw the rest of his time with the team.

    I always figured he was found money for the GM, but still, always think of him as more of an Ash guy.

  11. “Most aloof”?

    • I noticed that too, I assume that Stoets meant “most not aloof” because he likes to word things in such a way…

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