Archive for the ‘Twitter’ Category

2012-2013 NBA Most Valuable Player AwardA few weeks ago, FOX Sports columnist Jon Morosi wrote an especially frustrating piece on the unexpected woes of the Toronto Blue Jays. It was disconcerting not for offering a particularly revealing examination of an ugly and unconsidered truth, but rather because it was the type of column for which the writer very clearly had a narrative-based idea in mind, and then sought out evidence to support it, as opposed to formulating an idea based on the information collected. The result was a column steeped in small sample citations, cherry-picked data and quotations from questionable sources.

It angered me. And so, I wrote a piece in response to the original article in the heat of my righteous indignation.

It was stupid, not because I was wrong in my criticism, but because I was outraged over a column about baseball. Morosi’s writing was an estimated thirty-five times removed from anything resembling importance or relevance, and yet it succeeded in making me feel petulance to the point of expression. This is only made more regrettable by considering that such a reaction was quite possibly the very goal of the author.

I thought of this last night when social media went berserk over the idea of the Miami Herald’s Dan Le Batard voting for someone other than LeBron James for the NBA’s Most Valuable Player.

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toddfrazierSpending all day – every day – immersed in sports is a bit like working at Pizza Hut and eating nothing but pizza. If one is unburdened by such matters as personal health and waistline size, pizza is a wonderful thing. Unfortunately, too much of a wonderful thing is likely to leave one no longer believing the wonderful thing to be all that wonderful.

Sports are really, really great. However, the more time you spend reading and writing about a topic, the greater the chance that its ugliness will be realized. This is why our focus often becomes embittered by all of the negative aspects present in sports. We forget why sports are so great to begin with. And so, that’s where The Week In Sports Happiness comes into play.

Every week, I’ll present the ten things that are making me happy from the world of sports. It might be a particular article, it could be a winning streak, it may even be an animated GIF. No matter what, it’s from sports, it made me feel good inside, and I hope it does the same for you.

Without further ado, sports the good:

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Pocono 400 - PracticeA long time ago, people watched sporting events without the benefit of social media. This is commonly referred to as the dark ages of sports. Then, in the late aughties, Darren Rovell brought us into the light when he invented Twitter for the dual-purpose of better commodifying the human experience and giving individual members of society a means by which we might inflict increased scorn upon one another for differing opinions on sports.

After this, we began to consume sports in an entirely different fashion, conversing in the most snarkish fashion imaginable while exchanging insults with people all around the world. It was a revolution.

And that revolution continues today, shifting the measurements by which we judge each other as sports fans. No longer do we consider how long one has supported a sports franchise to be telling of one’s status as a fan. Instead, we look to the amount of sick burns one has laid down on opposing players and fans of other teams. One’s success or failures in social media now informs one’s success or failures as a sports fan.

As it is with everything, there is an absolute right way and an absolute wrong way of using Twitter to follow sports. It’s black and white with absolutely no gray, whatsoever. As a self-proclaimed expert in this field, I get mentioned all the time on Twitter by followers asking me about proper social media etiquette. In order to avoid these requests from further polluting my @ mention feed, I thought I should share my depth of knowledge on issues pertaining to Twitter, as it specifically relates to sports fans in an easily accessed blog post.

And so, without further ado, here are the ten most important rules that exist for sports fans using social media.

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nebraskacancerkidSpending all day – every day – immersed in sports is a bit like working at Pizza Hut and eating nothing but pizza. If one is unburdened by such matters as personal health and waistline size, pizza is a wonderful thing. Unfortunately, too much of a wonderful thing is likely to leave one no longer believing the wonderful thing to be all that wonderful.

Sports are really, really great. However, the more time you spend reading and writing about a topic, the greater the chance that its ugliness will be realized. This is why our focus often becomes embittered by all of the negative aspects present in sports. We forget why sports are so great to begin with. And so, that’s where The Sports Culture Happiness Index comes to play.

Every week, I’ll present the ten things that are making me happy from the world of sports. It might be a particular article, it could be a winning streak, it may even be an animated GIF. No matter what, it’s from sports, it made me feel good inside, and I hope it does the same for you.

Without further ado, sports the good:

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rosenthal-2

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

The infamous question is a philosophical thought experiment meant to arouse curiosity over the nature of observation and what we understand to be reality. It’s also used by undergrads studying philosophy to sound more musing than they truly are (as well as a cross-section of other weirdoes who often follow up the original question by asking if you’d like to feel their heart with a body part other than your hand).

A more modern equivalent to such an inquiry might be:

If a person tweets to no followers, does he or she actually have an opinion on sports?

Of course, an ontological question of such magnitude for the sports fan requires further examination.

Why does this hypothetical he or she not have any followers? Did the person constantly retweet the spelling mistakes of people they’re not even following, instigating a mass exodus of followers? Are they the only account free from “bots” following them? Do he or she not receive mentions advising them of methods for the inflation of their sexual organs? Why wouldn’t this person just buy some fake followers?

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