Worst. Call. Ever.

Pictured above is Ike Davis, and in that picture above, Ike Davis isn’t very happy.

The unhappiness of Ike Davis has little to do with what commonly makes people feel unhappy, like:

  • death;
  • poverty;
  • sickness; or
  • being Jose Canseco.

Ike Davis is displeased with his plight because during last night’s second game of a double header between the San Francisco Giants and his New York Mets, it became apparent that the umpiring crew was no longer interested in working a seventh hour of baseball in one day.

Sadly for Ike Davis, this moment of realization occurred to home plate umpire Dana DeMuth (not a fake name) during Ike Davis’ plate appearance in the bottom of the eighth inning when Clay Hensley threw his second pitch of the at bat.

It looked something like this:

Now, you may be thinking that there was some miraculous spin on Hensley’s change up that caused it to enter the strike zone and then bend almost a foot away from the plate before landing in Hector Sanchez’s glove.

No, that’s not the case.


That red little square, out there on its own, the furthest width wise from the strike zone square is the pitch that I’m writing about. The pitch was approximately a foot and a half outside the middle of the strike zone, or approximately eight inches away from the edge of the strike zone.

Even if we look at the pitch in terms of the strike zone umpire typically call (represented by the dashed line), it’s still a few inches away from anything that’s normally called.

That’s it. That little red triangle that has more in common with the green geometric shape near it than the red ones to which classification it belongs. It’s funny that this would happen this way, because what makes that little red triangle unique is what upset Ike Davis. He felt as though he was treated in an unfairly unique fashion during his at bat, most¬†notably¬†with that unique little red triangle.

Sadly for Ike Davis, such is life sometimes. Circumstances can conspire against you.

Perhaps he can take some solace in that he doesn’t have to deal with:

  • death;
  • poverty;
  • sickness; or
  • being Jose Canseco.