Archive for the ‘Fame Audits’ Category

The concept of the Fame Audit was first pioneered by the fine website Fametracker.com during the early part of the last decade. The snarky, pop culture-based evaluations of relative and deserved levels of fame for actors or musicians were debated by alert writers, many of whom went on to bigger and better things like the Onion AV Club and death.

In my infinite, creatively bereft wisdom, and with Fame Tracker lying dormant for the better part of 4 years (well beyond the internet statute of limitations of 20 minutes), I thought it might be a hoot to re-purpose the Fame Audit and apply it to baseball players. Who is more famous than his playing ability deserves? Who isn’t famous enough? Why might a given player lag behind/receive undue fame?

Back again for 2012 – the Getting Blanked Fame Audits return! And who gets to see their persona under the microscope? None other than Canadian Jesus Himself, Brett Lawrie.

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The Nana Index Comes Alive

Those familiar with Getting Blanked will know that one of the crutches we rely on to measure the fame levels of baseball players is guessing how many nanas out of 100 would recognize their name. Well, that entirely unscientific guess work got a little more legitimate over the All-Star break as we called up our grandmothers and asked them about some of the 2011 MLB All-Stars.


The concept of the Fame Audit was first pioneered by the fine website Fametracker.com during the early part of the last decade. With Fame Tracker lying dormant for the better part of 4 years (well beyond the internet statute of limitations of 20 minutes), we here at Getting Blanked thought it might be a hoot to re-purpose the Fame Audit and apply it to baseball players.

Who is more famous than his playing ability deserves? Who isn’t famous enough? Why might a given player lag behind/receive undue fame? How many Derek Jeter insults can we slip into each post? Today’s subject is universal pariah Alex Rodriguez.

Alex Rodriguez is a preposterously good baseball player. Unfathomably good. He looks and plays as though he was genetically engineered to play baseball at its absolute highest level – which he has done since the age of 18. Eighteen.

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The concept of the Fame Audit was first pioneered by the fine website Fametracker.com during the early part of the last decade. With Fame Tracker lying dormant for the better part of 4 years (well beyond the internet statute of limitations of 20 minutes), we here at Getting Blanked thought it might be a hoot to re-purpose the Fame Audit and apply it to baseball players.

Who is more famous than his playing ability deserves? Who isn’t famous enough? Why might a given player lag behind/receive undue fame? How many Derek Jeter insults can we slip into each post? Today’s subject is Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista.

George Foster hit 52 home runs for the 1977 Cincinnati Reds, a jump of 23 from his previous season and career high. Foster started his career in San Francisco but found a home in Cincy, putting together two solid seasons before breaking out during the expansion year. Nobody else was able to duplicate this round numbered feat for another 14 years.

George Foster was famous for the time between 1977 and 1991, when Cecil Fielder became the first guy to hit 50 home runs and stood-in as the go-to reference as the last guy to hit 50 before everybody starting doing it. George Foster is not famous. Cecil Fielder is mildly infamous.

Jose Bautista’s story is quite unlike either of these players because Jose Bautista’s story is unlike any other player’s story. There are similar stories in terms of older, well-traveled players getting their first shot at regular playing time, but very few take that ball and run with it quite like Jose Bautista did in 2010.

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The concept of the Fame Audit was first pioneered by the fine website Fametracker.com during the early part of the last decade. The snarky, pop culture-based evaluations of relative and deserved levels of fame for actors or musicians were debated by alert writers, many of whom went on to bigger and better things like the Onion AV Club and death.

In my infinite, creatively bereft wisdom, and with Fame Tracker lying dormant for the better part of 4 years (well beyond the internet statute of limitations of 20 minutes), I thought it might be a hoot to re-purpose the Fame Audit and apply it to baseball players. Who is more famous than his playing ability deserves? Who isn’t famous enough? Why might a given player lag behind/receive undue fame? How many Derek Jeter insults can we slip into each post?

Follow me under the jump as we focus the Getting Blanked Fame Audit microscope on none other than Roy Halladay.

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