Archive for the ‘Oddest Batting Stances’ Category

Let the countdown commence:

Okay, so who was missed?

True story: Despite being referred to as a convert to Judaism in Adam Sandler’s The Chanukah Song, Hall of Famer Rod Carew has never formally made that commitment. The confusion is somewhat understandable however. According to Wikipedia, Carew is married to a Jewish woman and his three daughters have been raised in a traditional Jewish fashion.

Despite the mix up over his religion, there’s no mistaking that Carew’s batting stance is an odd one. Segue! The Mike Toth school of journalism, everyone.

This is the fourth of a ten part series that The Score is producing on the oddest batting stances in baseball.

True story: Given his iron man record, it seems almost fitting that Cal Ripken Jr. played all 33 innings of the longest professional baseball game of all time.

Perhaps it was there that Ripken first learned how to keep things interesting and to eschew the boring and typical, as was later evidenced by his constantly changing batting stance.

This is the third of a ten part series that The Score is producing on the oddest batting stances in baseball.

True story: When Gary Sheffield was growing up, he lived in the projects near Tampa, with his uncle, some guy named Dwight Gooden.

I’m not sure if Gooden had anything to do with the herky jerky chaos that is The Sheff’s batting stance, but the only way he could look more coked up at the plate was if his teeth were more clenched and he constantly insisted on listening to Interpol while standing in the batter’s box.

This is the second of a ten part series that The Score is producing on the oddest batting stances in baseball.

When asked about the oddest batting stances in baseball, several players mentioned how Craig Counsell used to point his bat toward heaven and his back toward the pitcher.

Perhaps the only thing more surprising than the stance is the fact that Craig Counsell is still playing baseball! However, he might want to consider going back to his more kooky stance. Using the more traditional method at the plate hasn’t brought him a whole lot of success this year with the Milwaukee Brewers, where his .258 on base percentage is more depressing than being behind the Pittsbrugh Pirates in the NL Central standings.

This is the first of a ten part series that The Score is producing on the oddest batting stances in baseball.