Archive for the ‘Rogers Centre’ Category

Fortunately, not everything in Toronto is as suspect as the ongoing mechanical integrity of the Rogers Center. The Getting Blanked Show is a well-oiled machine of punditry and wise-crackery talk about the broken Rogers Center, the broken Yankees and the broken records for broken attendance (broken the bad way.)

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For Toronto Blue Jays fans, the 2012 season will be one that’s best forgotten. Unfortunately, considering the manner in which disappointing individual performances conspired with a ridiculous slew of injuries to derail the team’s chances of competing for a playoff spot, a blissful ignorance of this year’s events is most unlikely.

Further ensuring that memories from this lost season toil in the collective minds of supporters was Tuesday night’s baseball game (and I use the term loosely). Not only did the least attended game of the year at Rogers Centre end in a 12-0 defeat at the hands of the division rival Baltimore Orioles, but in the process of losing, the Blue Jays’ stadium essentially broke down.

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The following facts, which veer toward irony when combined, are seldom lost on the people of Toronto who attend baseball games at Rogers Centre with anything approaching regularity.

  • The Toronto Blue Jays are owned by Rogers Communications.
  • Rogers Communications is one of the largest communications companies in Canada.
  • Rogers Communications specializes in providing wireless communications and internet service.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays play at Rogers Centre, a baseball stadium owned by Rogers Communications.
  • Rogers Centre has terrible wireless coverage and absolutely no public Wi-Fi access whatsoever, often forcing baseball fans to tie metal pie plates to the signal receiver on their telephones just to inform loved ones that the game is going into extra innings, and they’ll be late coming home.

So, it’s not entirely surprsing to learn that the people working at Rogers Center as part of the operations of the baseball team, might also be without access to the national cable sports channel that Rogers owns and operates.

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