No prospects get scrutinized like quarterbacks do. It’s practically impossible to find a can’t-miss signal caller, and there’s a seemingly never-ending list of sure-fire duds who turned into stars.

No position requires such a high level of intellect, which is why we care so much about Wonderlic scores. But even that’s not a fool-proof indicator.

You don’t need to be fast, but you have to be elusive and you need to have pocket presence.

You don’t need to have pin-point accuracy, but you’d better have a cannon. Or vice versa.

You don’t need to be a fiery leader, but you can’t afford to be a divisive locker-room presence.

In evaluating quarterbacks, world-famous talent evaluator Bills Parcells applies a set of seven criteria. ESPN’s KC Joyner explains: “These include being a three-year starter, a senior in college, a college graduate, starting 30 games, winning 23 games, having a 2-to-1 touchdown-to-interception ratio and a completion rate of 60 percent.”

So let’s use the above criteria to compare the quarterbacks in this year’s draft:

Andy Dalton, TCU
Three-year starter? Yes (4)
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (49)
23 wins? Yes (38)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (71-to-30)
Above 60 percent? Yes (61.7%)
Total: 7/7

Colin Kaepernick, Nevada
Three-year starter? Yes (4)
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (51)
23 wins? Yes (33)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (82-to-24)
Above 60 percent? No (58.2%)
Total: 6/7

Ricky Stanzi, Iowa
Three-year starter? Yes
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (35)
23 wins? Yes (26)
2-to-1 ratio? No (56-to-31)
Above 60 percent? No (59.8%)
Total: 5/7 (with two extremely close “No”s)

Greg McElroy, Alabama
Three-year starter? No (2)
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? No (27)
23 wins? Yes (24)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (39-to-10)
Above 60 percent? Yes (66.3%)
Total: 5/7

Christian Ponder, Florida State
Three-year starter? Yes
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (34)
23 wins? No (21)
2-to-1 ratio? No (49-to-30)
Above 60 percent? Yes (61.8%)
Total: 5/7

Nathan Enderle, Idaho
Three-year starter? Yes (4)
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (47)
23 wins? No (17)
2-to-1 ratio? No (74-to-60)
Above 60 percent? No (54.6%)
Total: 4/7

Jake Locker, Washington
Three-year starter? Yes (4)
Senior? Yes
Graduate? Yes
30 games? Yes (39)
23 wins? No (16)
2-to-1 ratio? No (53-to-35)
Above 60 percent? No (53.9)
Total: 4/7

Blaine Gabbert, Missouri
Three-year starter? No (2)
Senior? No
Graduate? No
30 games? No (26)
23 wins? No (18)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (40-to-18)
Above 60 percent? Yes (60.9%)
Total: 2/7

Cam Newton, Auburn
Three-year starter? No (1)
Senior? No
Graduate? No
30 games? No (16)
23 wins? No (14)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (30-to-7)
Above 60 percent? Yes (65.4%)
Total: 2/7

Ryan Mallett, Arkansas
Three-year starter? No (2)
Senior? No
Graduate? No
30 games? No (29)
23 wins? No (20)
2-to-1 ratio? Yes (69-to-24)
Above 60 percent? No (57.8%)
Total: 1/7

So arguably the four highest-rated quarterbacks in the draft have the four lowest scores. Not-so-coincidentally, Locker, Newton and Mallett also had lower Wonderlic scores than Dalton, Stanzi, McElroy and Ponder (I’m yet to see scores from Kaepernick or Enderle, while Gabbert actually fared quite well).

Based on this, would it shock anyone if Dalton or Kaepernick ended up having better careers than Gabbert or Newton? This is why drafting quarterbacks is so difficult. And this is why the Carolina Panthers should embrace guys like Patrick Peterson and Von Miller.