Warning: apc_store(): Potential cache slam averted for key 'w3tc_blogs.thescore.com_1_sql_95ee78392381ffbfe4b66e3133ee6205' in /opt/blogs/wp-content/plugins/w3-total-cache/lib/W3/Cache/Apc.php on line 41 Warning: apc_store(): Potential cache slam averted for key 'w3tc_blogs.thescore.com_object_9ee1addf54ad00867451ed4d367f2c40' in /opt/blogs/wp-content/plugins/w3-total-cache/lib/W3/Cache/Apc.php on line 41 Mike Adams is good at turning lemons into lemonade | 100 Yards and Running | Blogs | theScore.com

Usually when word surfaces of a positive drug test just a week before the draft, we can automatically assume that the player involved will live a life of eternal damnation. That especially applies when said player eats marijuana like a delicious candy treat.

But Ohio State’s Mike Adams is quite good with a figurative blender.

Adams is one of the top offensive tackles in this year’s draft, and he’s been pegged as a possible late first-round pick. But today NFL Network’s Jason La Canfora revealed that Adams failed a drug test at the NFL Scouting Combine. Again, this is normally the part where we’d stick several bright red flags by Adams’ name on the draft board, and politely provide him with a cushion to soften his fall.

Instead, Adams was honest after he learned about the test while he was meeting with coaches and executives during private workouts and at Ohio State’s Pro Day, and the maturity he showed while speaking with interested teams may have actually had the opposite effect. Adams might make history, and become the first prospect to raise his draft stock by getting high.

From La Canfora:

He has been forthright and league sources said he is viewed as a “good kid” who obviously made a mistake. The key for Adams will be learning from it. Several teams said they were impressed with Adams during interviews with him.

One mistake generally won’t cause a significant fall, as it’s often the cumulative effect of several mistakes that leads to a player being selected far lower than he should have been if teams based their draft evaluation solely on talent (see: Jenkins, Janoris).

The lesson here for future draft picks is one that should be common knowledge, but is often only learned through experience for these young college athletes being pulled in many conflicting directions. Redeeming yourself after a misstep can be done easily if you handle said mistake with the maturity and professionalism expected of a young adult.

Of course, maybe I’m just in a rare jovial mood with these kind words and I consumed far too much herbal tea, because Adams must have known pot was in his system at the Combine, and he’s therefore rather unintelligent since he flunked a test that was scheduled months in advance.