Greg Jennings might not be able to put his team on his back this week, bro.

When Jennings left Green Bay’s loss to San Francisco late in the game, the severity of his groin injury was unclear. But what was clear to every Jennings owner is this: short weeks suck.

If his injury was anything more than a mild aggravation, Jennings’ status would automatically be in serious doubt with the short turnaround for the Packers’ Thursday night game against the Bears this week, and therefore he’d have three fewer days to rest and receive treatment. And indeed last night we learned that’s the case, as his status remains uncertain today after head coach Mike McCarthy said that following the game Jennings “didn’t feel very good,” but his condition improved somewhat on Monday.

We’ll update this situation later today with our daily journey around the NFL’s training tables, but you should already start preparing to dig into your bench depth if you own Jennings, or to scour the waiver wire if you’re in a deep league. Of course, if you’re the proud owner of Jordy Nelson, this news is reason for great glee.

Jennings missed the final three games of last season, which included one of the Packers’ showdowns against the division rival Bears. So with Jennings out and all of Aaron Rodgers’ attention focused on him when the offense was looking to stretch the field, Nelson had six receptions for 115 yards (including a 55-yard catch) and two touchdowns. That’s a cool 17 fantasy points, but Nelson wasn’t the only receiver to benefit from Jennings’ absence.

When the dominoes fell and someone needed to fill the No. 2 hole because Nelson was busy filling the No. 1 hole, James Jones received the increase in receptions and targets. That resulted in 50 receiving yards and two touchdowns of his own during that Week 16 game against the Bears, and even this past Sunday with Jennings healthy for most of the game Jones still finished with 81 yards and a score.

Jones is then the immediate pickup for Jennings owners fearing bad news later today, with Randall Cobb another option, although he’ll likely remain the slot receiver. If he doesn’t practice in at least a limited capacity today, the chances that No. 85 will play just two days from now are slim. Settle down, though, my instinctively cliff seeking fantasy friends, because Jones is available in 77 percent of Yahoo leagues, a number that jumps to 87 percent in ESPN leagues.

Make the precautionary move now, and consider it a one-week handcuff.

And now the links part of the links post…

  • There are real people in Cleveland who are clamoring for Colt McCoy after ONE GAME FROM BRANDON WEEDEN. We get it, Weeden sucked, and he sucked a lot. But dear god people, a little patience please, and at least satisfy yourself that Weeden is definitely the next Brady Quinn. I shouldn’t need to write this, but Weeden’s woefulness adds to the fact that there’s little fantasy value –or at least starter value — in any Brown not named Trent Richardson. [Cleveland Plain-Dealer]
  • Welcome to the new Joe Flacco. Will you stick around this time, Joe? [Patrick Daugherty]
  • Good news for every fantasy owner of everyone everywhere: Week 1 was the highest-scoring kickoff week in league history. [Gregg Rosenthal]
  • If you’re in a two QB league, does Tim Tebow have value? Probably not, but I just worked a Tim Tebow reference into a post again. BOOM. [The Fake Football]
  • John Skelton is expected to miss two-to-four weeks. I’m really not sure if this helps or hurts Larry Fitzgerald. I just hope that one day the football gods allow him to receive passes from a league average quarterback again. [PFT]

Comments (4)

  1. I’d say go pick up Randall Cobb.

    • They’ll both be fine pickups, and overall I think you’d be happy with either one. However, I’m siding with Jones because he has an edge due to his greater usage. During Sunday’s game Jones was on the field for 61 of the 72 offensive plays Green Bay ran, while Cobb was in for 38.

      So with that split and Cobb remaining as a slot receiver, you’re hoping for a home run catch from him, while Jones is more likely to receive a higher volume of targets while split out wide in Jennings’ absence.

      • The target numbers don’t support this and I care way more about target numbers than snap participation numbers. Cobb was more heavily targeted and should remain so going forward. The Packers are essentially using him as a 3rd down back. To call him a “slot receiver” is misleading, IMO.

        • I count 10 targets for Cobb, and nine for Jones Sunday, which clearly isn’t a significant advantage. But your point about Cobb essentially being a third down back is a good one.

          Again, there’s a hair-splitting element to this, and I just think that in the end Jones will have an edge in production Thursday, but he won’t trounce Cobb.

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