I enjoy guessing games, but only the type in which I have to guess which hat is hiding an object. Or, better yet, Guess Who is great family fun. It’s the board game for everyone which doesn’t at all encourage stereotyping.

However, I don’t enjoy guessing games with football injuries, especially if they involve running backs. Teams should be far more considerate of our fantasy needs while disclosing information, and immediately provide us with the most accurate timetable for a players’ absence.

Right now, the Bears and head coach Lovie Smith are jerking us around regarding Matt Forte’s injury, and the karma from their actions will come back with the vengeance of a scorned woman whose cheating husband needed to change a lot of light bulbs.

When Forte left the Bears’ loss to the Packers last Thursday, reports from trusted sources who have trusted sources within the Bears organization said that the running back’s injury was most likely the dreaded high ankle sprain. But earlier this morning Smith flatly denied that, and said those trusted sources who believed Forte had a high ankle sprain have now shaken that belief.

While speaking to a Chicago radio station, Smith only said that Forte is sore, and when the Bears signed Kalil Bell over the weekend to add further depth at the position beyond Michael Bush it was a clear indication that Forte will miss some time. But exactly how much time isn’t certain, although if it’s just your garden variety sprain then Forte’s time on the shelf will presumably be much shorter.

Smith said the injury will be watched closely throughout the week.

“Matt did go down with an ankle injury. It’s not a high ankle sprain, as has been reported. But right now, you know when you don’t finish the game and he still has some soreness, we’ll continue to monitor it, but we felt we needed another running back here, that’s why we brought back a guy who knows our system and has played good ball for us in Kahlil Bell.”

Nothing changes here in the short term. Even if the injury is more mild as Smith describes, Forte will still miss at least one week, and we can be reasonably confident that he’ll miss two. Any missed time is worse than no missed time, but as you’re lamenting your running back injury be aware that it could be much worse, as high ankle sprains are often a one-month shelving at minimum, followed by a nagging and lingering soreness which can heavily restrict performance.

So consider that long-term bullet dodged, which is splendid news regarding your second-round running back. If you were able to handcuff Bush, then he’s the obvious play for Chicago’s Week 3 game against St. Louis, a team with the second worst rushing defense in the league a year ago. If not and you’re not overly confident in your other RB3 options, then godspeed, because the waiver wire is predictably shallow.

Mikel Leshoure could be a decent desperation play during his first game back, but he’ll likely start out in a time share with Kevin Smith. A dead even split surfaced this week in the Steelers’ backfield between Jonathan Dwyer and Isaac Redman with Rashard Mendenhall still out, and Dwyer is available in 71 percent of Yahoo leagues with a Raiders defense that gave up 172 rushing yards and two touchdowns yesterday to Reggie Bush on deck next week, so there’s that (Dwyer is far less available in ESPN leagues at 54 percent).

Comments (1)

  1. Most ankle sprains happen when you make a rapid shifting movement with your foot planted, such as when you play soccer or get tackled in football. Often the ankle rolls outward and the foot turns inward. This causes the ligaments on the outside of the ankle to stretch and tear. Less often, the ankle rolls inward and the foot turns outward. This damages the ligaments on the inside of the ankle. See a picture of the different types of ankle sprains”;“

    Till next time
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