UPDATE: Annnd to the surprise of no one, McCoy has now accepted the job.

Sometime today we’ll learn that Mike McCoy has been named the Chargers’ next head coach. Or we won’t, but we probably will.

As we’ve repeated so many times, during this hiring period in which eight head coach vacancies were created starting on Black Monday, the truth has been a very elusive beast that can morph into many forms. It has eaten several well-respected and usually well-sourced insiders whole. That most infamously applies to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, whose source put the odds of Andy Reid touching down in the Arizona desert at 95 percent. Thankfully I’m not a wagering man, Adam, because I have sharp pitchforks. Seriously, I carry them at all times. No, you’re crazy.

So with that, I give you this…

That came down after CBS’ Jason La Canfora reported a little earlier this morning that after interviewing McCoy, the Chargers are indeed close to naming him as their next head coach. That means those Cardinals will be left doing what the Cardinals do best: desperately searching, and grasping. Widespread reports yesterday indicated that McCoy was set to interview with the Cards for a second time, which clearly shows interest on their behalf.

If this very likely Chargers marriage does indeed become reality later today, it’s probably yet another example of exactly how far the Cardinals have fallen offensively since the Kurt Warner years that culminated in a Super Bowl appearance. McCoy — who’s the Broncos’ offensive coordinator, at least for a few more hours/minutes — is obviously selling himself on his offensive mind, and more specifically his ability to both develop a quarterback, and cater an offense to a QB’s skillset. A year ago after the Broncos had a horrendous start and lost four of their first five games, Tim Tebow was named the starting quarterback. McCoy then tailored the entire offense around a quarterback who couldn’t complete a forward pass for much of the season, as Tebow’s completion percentage was just 46.5, and his completions were in the single digits during four of his 11 regular-season starts, unbelievably falling as low as two.

Essentially, McCoy structured an offense which allowed Tebow to mock the quarterback position while excelling with his only true skill: running, and running all the time.

Then this year Peyton Manning arrived, and while the ex-Colt had a terrific season overall, his arm needed to be brought along slowly after multiple neck surgeries over the past two years. McCoy did that too, structuring an offense filled with short to intermediate passes early in the season, and limiting Manning’s deep throwing until his arm strength returned to its normal state after the first few weeks.

So he has a heavy recent history of adapting to the quarterback, and building up the quarterback. And in his interviews that was surely what attracted both the Cardinals and Chargers to him. McCoy was then left with a choice, one that was ultimately easy. He could develop Kevin Kolb and tie his head coaching reputation to a quarterback who may be far beyond repair. Or he could take on the Philip Rivers resurrection project, and right a wayward arm who has had sustained high-level success in his career, but he’s declined significantly over the past two seasons.

That decision didn’t take long.

And now the links part of the links post…

  • Elsewhere on the carousel, Gus Bradley is reportedly the Eagles’ top choice, though a deal isn’t imminent. [Reuben Frank]
  • And Marc Trestman is reportedly the “heavy favorite” in Chicago. [Vaughn McClure]
  • Tim Tebow’s NFL career is likely over, or at least it’s stalled quite nicely. Did he deserve better? [Gregg Doyel]
  • A list of wide receivers who could be on the move this offseason. [Evan Silva]
  • The Chiefs hold the first overall pick this April, and they’ll draft the “best player available”. In mid-January, saying that means so very little. [Kansas City Star]

Comments (1)

  1. Toronto Blue Jays utility man turned Coach of the Chargers, sounds about right

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