It is being widely speculated that a Carolina Hurricanes’ press conference scheduled for 2:30 pm on Wednesday will be where Rod Brind’Amour will formerly announce his retirement. Rod “The Bod” Brind’Amour is expected to take on a “new challenge” with the team after spending the last 10 seasons as a player there. Brind’Amour spent parts of the last five seasons as the Hurricanes’ captain, before relinquishing the duties to Eric Staal mid-season in 2009-10.

He will finish his NHL career with 1484 games played and 1184 points. Brind’Amour was an integral piece of the Carolina Hurricanes’ march to the Stanley Cup Finals in 2002, before losing to the Detroit Red Wings. A rejuvenated Brind’Amour potted 12 goals in 25 playoff games during the team’s 2006 Stanley Cup winning season. Following a move from Philadelphia to Carolina in 2000, Brind’Amour looked to be on a steady decline for several injury-plagued seasons. The lockout served him well, as Brind’Amour enjoyed his most productive seasons since the mid-90s following the year long layoff.

Rod Brind’Amour will best be remembered as an elite two-way centre, having twice been a recipient of the Frank J. Selke trophy as the league’s best defensive forward. Off the ice, and in pictures, he’ll be remembered for his Atlas-esque build and dedication to conditioning.

Leading up to today’s expected announcement, Brind’Amour was viewed as a potential buyout candidate for the Hurricanes with one-year left on his contract.  More than likely, Brind’Amour will still have to be bought out for the purposes of his retirement.  It was becoming increasingly clear over the last couple of seasons that Brind’Amour had lost a step, although he was still a more than serviceable player. Team president and general manager Jim Rutherford is expected to be on-hand with Brind’Amour at today’s presser; a classy send-off for one of the franchise’s greatest players.

Witness “The Bod” in action here.

Comments (1)

  1. Rod Brindamour is one of those rare players who ,whereever he played, made a positive impact.

    He took care of his body, especially as he aged, and always came ready to play.

    He made all his teams better. He will be missed as a player, but I’d put money on him as a future coaching prospect.

    Good luck, Rod. (sorry for misspelling his name),

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