Archive for the ‘Ultimate Raptors Rankings’ Category

Marcus Camby

The Ultimate Raptors Rankings are the RaptorBlog editors’ attempt to rank the top 30 Toronto Raptors of all time. These rankings are obviously somewhat arbitrary and endlessly debatable, but they’re based on each player’s contribution, performance and longevity as a Raptor, and on how beloved they are by Raptors fans. We’ll count down a new Raptor every Wednesday on this blog.

Marcus Camby’s Raptors résumé:

  • Fourth in franchise history, blocks (360)
  • First in franchise history, blocks per game, minimum 100 games (2.9)
  • Named to 1996-97 All-Rookie First Team

Like many players drafted by the Raptors over the years, Marcus Camby stands out more for who he could have been rather than who we was. The Raptors won the 1996 draft lottery, which ordinarily means that team gets the first pick in the subsequent draft. However, the Raptors and Grizzlies had an agreement with the league that disallowed them from drafting first overall, so that pick and Allen Iverson went to Philadelphia.

With the second overall pick in that draft, Camby was the obvious choice. He won that year’s John R. Wooden Award, the Naismith Men’s College Player of the Year Award and the AP Player of the Year Award after averaging 20.5 points, 8.2 rebounds and 3.9 blocks per game. He led Massachussets to the Final Four before they succumbed to Kentucky, the eventual champion. In his most noteworthy performance of his final college season, he scored 17 points while holding Tim Duncan to just nine points when they were both juniors. It appeared that the skinny, 6-foot-11, 22-year-old had almost unlimited potential. He was long, athletic, aggressive on both ends of the floor, and he could dribble as well as most players six inches shorter than him. If Camby was the Raptors’ “consolation prize” for getting screwed out of being able to draft Iverson, it looked like a pretty damn good one.

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The Ultimate Raptors Rankings are the RaptorBlog editors’ attempt to rank the top 30 Toronto Raptors of all time. These rankings are obviously somewhat arbitrary and endlessly debatable, but they’re based on each player’s contribution, performance and longevity as a Raptor, and on how beloved they are by Raptors fans. We’ll count down a new Raptor every Wednesday on this blog.

Anthony Parker’s Raptors résumé:

  • 10th on Toronto’s All-Time Games Played and Minutes Played lists
  • Third on Toronto’s All Time Three-point Field Goal percentage list
  • Starting shooting guard for only division championship team in franchise history

Perhaps it was fitting that in what turned out to be one of the more embarrassing moments in Raptors history, it was little known Anthony Parker that made a name for himself. For a man that has spent most of his NBA career being overlooked, it was Parker who hit the winning shot in Maccabi Tel Aviv’s  shocking exhibition win over the Raptors in 2005.

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The Ultimate Raptors Rankings are the RaptorBlog editors’ attempt to rank the top 30 Toronto Raptors of all time. These rankings are obviously somewhat arbitrary and endlessly debatable, but they’re based on each player’s contribution, performance and longevity as a Raptor, and on how beloved they are by Raptors fans. We’ll count down a new Raptor every Wednesday on this blog.

T.J. Ford’s Raptors résumé:

  • 10th on Toronto’s All-Time points-per-game list (13.2)
  • 2nd on Toronto’s All-Time assists-per-game list (7.2)
  • 5th on Toronto’s All-Time Player Efficiency Rating list (19.0)
  • Starting point guard on the only division championship team in franchise history

When Bryan Colangelo traded Charlie Villanueva for T.J. Ford in his first big splash as Raptors G.M., the fan-base was split. You had those who could see that the NBA was moving towards a guard’s league, salivating over the opportunities that T.J. provided. Then you had the basketball purists, who believed in the rule that you never trade big-for-small.

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Rasho Nesterovic

The Ultimate Raptors Rankings are the RaptorBlog editors’ attempt to rank the top 30 Toronto Raptors of all time. These rankings are obviously somewhat arbitrary and endlessly debatable, but they’re based on each player’s contribution, performance and longevity as a Raptor, and on how beloved they are by Raptors fans. We’ll count down a new Raptor every Wednesday on this blog.

Rasho Nesterovic’s Raptors résumé:

When Rasho Nesterovic was acquired by the Raptors in a June 2006 trade that sent Matt Bonner, Eric Williams and a 2009 second round pick to San Antonio, it’s likely that there were a lot of casual Raptors fans wondering what the hell Bryan Colangelo was doing. Bonner was a fan favorite and Nesterovic might have appeared to be a giant stiff who neither scored nor rebounded particularly well. Luckily, Colangelo knew that Rasho brought something the Raptors desperately needed: solid post defense.

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The Ultimate Raptors Rankings are the RaptorBlog editors’ attempt to rank the top 30 Toronto Raptors of all time. These rankings are obviously somewhat arbitrary and endlessly debatable, but they’re based on each player’s contribution, performance and longevity as a Raptor, and on how beloved they are by Raptors fans. We’ll count down a new Raptor every Wednesday on this blog.

Keon Clark’s Raptors résumé:

  • Helped Toronto make the playoffs in both his seasons as a Raptor
  • Second in Raptors history in blocks per game, minimum 200 blocks (1.8)
  • Set franchise record with 12 blocks (in 28 minutes!) on March 23, 2001 against the Atlanta Hawks

Keon Clark wasn’t one of the most accomplished players to ever wear a Raptors uniform, but fans who watched him in Toronto from 2000-2002 would surely agree with me that he was one of the most exciting. He was all lean, coiled, explosive power — equally capable of throwing down a vicious dunk on one end and swatting an opponent’s attempt on the other end. There was very little finesse to his game — those springy legs propelled him higher than his opponents and he brought down righteous and furious anger upon them.

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