Sebastian Pruiti

sebastian pruiti

Sebastian Pruiti is the founder and editor of NBAPlaybook.com, a blog started in 2010 that takes a look at the Xs and Os of the NBA. He will be contributing weekly to The Basketball Jones with his Savvy/Shabby series that looks at the best and worst plays, coaching decisions, and player decisions in the NBA.

Recent Posts

One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

Continuing the Season Leftovers’ rotation, we are going to be once again looking at some great after timeout sets. As I mentioned in part 1, I really feel that after timeout sets that get drawn up or called by the coaching staff really show you how good of a Xs and Os coach you are. It’s one play, and whether you drew it up on the fly or called it out, it takes smarts to get the correct play run and have it work.

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One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

The first post in my Season Leftovers series looked at BLOB sets, and after looking at a few different plays in a few different situations, we have returned to BLOB sets, looking at a few more set plays coming from underneath the offense’s own basket.

Detroit Gets An Easy Look for Richard Hamilton

In recent years, Richard Hamilton has been one of my favorite players to watch, and usually it is when he doesn’t have the basketball. Hamilton might be the best player in the league at using screens off of the basketball (Ray Allen is up there as well), and coach John Kuester was able to use that skill to get his team, and one of his best shooters, a wide-open look late in their game against the Utah Jazz.

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One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been doing over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

When you think of late game execution, you always tend to think of it on the offensive end. However, execution and strategy is just as important defensively in late game situations. The plays that we are going to look at today are going to show fantastic execution and strategy defensively.

New Orleans’ Big to Big Switch

After a foul on a three-point shot by Jason Kidd, the Dallas Mavericks had 8.4 seconds to try and erase a 1-point deficit. There was little doubt who the basketball was going to, and the Mavericks tried to use off-ball screens to get Nowitzki the basketball. However, the Hornets’ bigs were able to switch a screen and wind up with a favorable matchup.

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One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been doing over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

Coming out of a timeout, trailing by one point with less that 24 seconds left in the game is one of the toughest positions for a head coach. The opposition gets to set up their defense and they are able react to whatever you do. Sure, you can go with an isolation, ensuring that your best player gets the shot. But if you run a set to put your best player in position to score, you are more likely to get an open shot. These coaches proved that.

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One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

In my opinion, post timeout playcalling really proves your Xs and Os knowledge as a head coach. You usually call a timeout because the other team is making a run and you need a bucket or because the game is close late and you need a basket to take the lead or put the game away. Needing a basket, you are more likely to run your best stuff, whether it be a set you practice all of the time, or a play that you drew up right on the sideline.

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One of my favorite college basketball blogs is a site called The Mikan Drill, a site that looks at the Xs and Os of the college game. Something that they have been over there since the season has ended was Season Leftovers, looking at some great sets over the course of the college season. An idea so good, that I decided to bring it over here during the NBA offseason.

The first group of sets that we are going to look at are BLOB sets, or Base Line Out of Bounds. In my opinion, scoring from the baseline in the NBA is probably the hardest situation due to the fact that you have 10 men in the area around the basket. This means that if you want to score directly out of a BLOB set, you have to run something really special:

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With the Miami Heat facing elimination in the NBA Finals, you knew that Game 6 was going to be an intense battle. You also knew that there were going to be some decisions and plays, both good and bad, that would help decide the game. This week, we are going to look at a decision that Rick Carlisle made that allowed the Mavericks to get back in the game and a play by Chris Bosh that gave Dirk Nowitzki an open three.

Dallas Goes Zone

In the first 5:41 of the first quarter, the Miami came out on fire, scoring 20 points and taking a 9-point lead over the Mavericks. With the Heat on pace to score 40 points in the quarter, Rick Carlisle decided to switch to the zone despite the fact that most of Miami’s points came from jump shots.

The change worked, as Miami scored just 7 points the rest of the quarter, mainly because the Heat started settling for outside jumpers, especially LeBron James.

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